E-Scribe : a programmer’s blog

About Me

PBX I'm Paul Bissex. I build web applications using open source software, especially Django. Started my career doing graphic design for newspapers and magazines in the '90s. Then wrote tech commentary and reviews for Wired, Salon, Chicago Tribune, and others you never heard of. Then I built operations software at a photography school. Then I helped big media serve 40 million pages a day. Then I worked on a translation services API doing millions of dollars of business. Now I'm building the core platform of a global startup accelerator. Feel free to email me.

Book

I co-wrote "Python Web Development with Django". It was the first book to cover the long-awaited Django 1.0. Published by Addison-Wesley and still in print!

Colophon

Built using Django, served with gunicorn and nginx. The database is SQLite. Hosted on a FreeBSD VPS at Johncompanies.com. Comment-spam protection by Akismet.

Pile o'Tags

Stuff I Use

bitbucket, Django, Emacs, FreeBSD, Git, jQuery, LaunchBar, Markdown, Mercurial, OS X, Python, Review Board, S3, SQLite, Sublime Text, Ubuntu Linux

Spam Report

At least 236507 pieces of comment spam killed since 2008, mostly via Akismet.

Hizzitachi

bling Hitachi really made a splash with their "Hard Drive is the New Bling" promotion, or contest, or campaign, or practical joke, or whatever it is. We all had a good laugh and the writers of Engadget swore off the word "bling" forevermore. But the tin-eared marketing pales next to the sheer wrongness underneath.

The pitch wasn't really about bling at all, or even geek bling. I imagine what it said before Cory Coolhunter in Marketing got hold of it was, "We should tell everybody that the best portable electronic devices use Hitachi microdrives." I think in the end that will prove to have been briefly true. But microdrives are on the way out. They have no inherent advantages over flash (that I know of), so they only exist at a particular size tier as long as flash memory at that tier is significantly more expensive. This is surely obvious to everyone, except maybe to Hitachi -- who don't seem to make flash memory devices.

A 2GB CF card is now cheaper than a 2GB microdrive in CF form and the gap is narrowing at the 4GB level as well. The iPod mini and its hard drive storage are out; the iPod nano and its flash memory storage are in. Samsung has announced a 32GB flash memory chip that will enter production next year, and is aiming to start replacing notebook hard drives with flash memory as well. Meanwhile, Hitachi's making jewelry.

Saturday, September 17th, 2005
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